News

Wed
16
Aug

Preparing the financials

The fiscal year ends Sept. 30 and taxing entities are gearing up to complete their budgets for the 2017-18 fiscal year.

At the Bosque County Commissioners’ Court, budget workshops started July 24, and the budget proposal was posted July

28. This proposed budget will be tweaked in the next couple of weeks, but it comes close to what the budget is expected to be.

The county budget and subsequent tax rate is coupled to the expected income from property taxes, fines, fees and grants.

Figures released by the County Tax Assessor/ Collector Arlene Swiney show the value of total taxable property at $1,572,460,452 with tax revenue of $7,229,037. On Monday, the appraisal roll and the certified estimate of the collection rate of 98 percent was approved.

Wed
09
Aug

WHAT'S GOING ON

Meridian Tribune

MES gets ready for school

The 2017-18 School Year is nearly upon us.

PreK & K registration is in person at the MES campus. PreK – begins Aug. 1, Kindergarten – begins Aug.

7. This year, all returning students to the Meridian Elementary School should be registered online starting Aug. 9 online. The Meet the Teacher night is scheduled for Aug. 24 3:30-5:30 p.m.

The School Dress Code will remain the same this coming year. Please refer to the 2016-2017 student handbook online at meridianisd.org for reminders of the expectations.

MES school hours are 7:55 –3:20. All Visitors are required to check in to the office and wear a visible guest badge at all times while in the building.

Wed
09
Aug

Final delivery

Meridian Mailman James McCarter has put some miles on the clock in the 37 years he worked for the United States Postal Services – one million wreck-free miles. Thirty-one of those years people could find McCarter on the county roads in northwest Bosque County, always ready with a wave and a smile.

On Saturday, his family held a retirement/birthday party in the Memorial Library Building in Meridian, so that customers, who became friends over the years could come and wish 70-year-old McCarter well, over a cup of punch and a cupcake.

After all those years, the work might have given him neck and back problems and the many miles along the county roads became a bit tedious and wore down his truck, but it was his beloved customers that always put a smile on McCarter’s face and a glint in his warm blue eyes.

Wed
09
Aug

EVERYBODY CHEER!

Summer is over, at least for students taking part in any sort of extra-curricular activity. Band camps, cheer camps, and football conditioning have all started.

At Jacket Nation, the annual Mini Cheer Camp heralds in the new football season, with new cheers and routines meant to fire up the Yellowjacket crowd and to instill Jacket Pride in the youngest supporters.

Last week, 34 mini jackets cheerleaders came to the Meridian High School gym for fun, games and the chance to show off their learned skills at the end of a three-morning camp, under the guidance of the Yellowjacket Varsity Cheerleading Squad.

The main dance was fittingly to Trivassi’s “Follow the Leader,” as the young Yellowjackets followed and copied each and every move their week’s mentors made. And as an extra surprise, Awesome – the Yellowjacket mascot – showed up to join them.

Wed
09
Aug

Putting the cherry on top

With the sun peeking through the live oak branches, many members of the Spring Creek Baptist Church stood in the early morning, dabbled shade to see, photograph and film how the Knight Brothers – Jim and Richard – placed a newly built steeple and bell on their beloved Bosque County church dating back to 1874.

It was an anxious moment Saturday when the addition was placed – would the lift be able to come high enough, would it fit? It cost the live oak tree by the door a bough, to get the lifting equipment close enough to the church, but within an hour, the new bell tower and cross stood out against the steel blue sky. The finishing touches were to secure the addition and attach the bell rope.

“This is just the cherry on the cake,” Church Trustee Nancy Massengale said. “This is the best little church with the best people. We never thought this is what the church was missing but doesn’t this look pretty? It just gives me the chills.”

Wed
09
Aug

Reading is fun

The Nellie Pederson Civic Library announced the winners of its 2017 Summer Reading Club and Poetry Contests on Saturday, August 5.

In all, summer reading club readers read for a total of 112 hours, or 6,725 minutes, library director Lewis Stansell said.

The top seven readers are Sarah Gable, Jennifer Gallagos, Jacob Grelle, Samantha Grelle, Caleb Ketchum, Waylon Tebo, and Rebekah Tyler.

The 2017 poetry contest winners (by age group) are Caleb Ketchum, Kindergarten; Jennifer Gallegos, first grade; Carla Pribble, third grade; and Sara Gable, fifth grade.

The winners received their certificates and prizes during a short ceremony at the CLIFTEX Theatre in historic downtown Clifton prior to a free screening of a family-friendly film.

The library’s annual summer reading program aims to assist parents in preventing reading loss for their children in elementary school over the summer months.

Wed
09
Aug

SCI-FI SERENADE

The next generation of musician-scholars lifted off from the Tin Building Theatre at the Bosque Arts Center in Clifton on Thursday, August 3.

The live music and dance performances by 40 youths that afternoon was a culmination of a week’s worth of hands-on educational activities during the Bosque Civic Music Association’s summer music camp.

The theme for the 8th Annual BCMA music camp – “Outer Space and Music of the Spheres” – invited students to practice the musicianship through creative works inspired by science facts and fiction.

With the house lights off, the recital began with a grand entry in which the elementary school aged children performed the theme from the 1978 film “Superman” with kazoos and laser swords.

When the lights came back on, camp instructor Vicky Ketchum welcomed the families and friends of the tiny titan performers to the program.

Wed
09
Aug

Construction Continues

A new report to the Clifton Economic Development Corporation indicated that a long-awaited travel center may open this fall in Clifton.

Construction activities at the Ranglers store location picked up earlier this summer with crews moving earth and leveling ground on the property on Hwy. 6.

In recent days, storm water drains were in the process of being laid and connected to the City’s infrastructure.

The 9,000 square-foot travel center is planned to include two fast-food chain restaurants in addition to convenience store items as well as gasoline and diesel sales for the rural market.

The store aims to serve agriculture-based business that seek to bypass I-35’s congestion by using Hwy. 6 for travel among communities between Houston and Abilene.

According to a recent Texas Department of Transportation traffic count report, 8,500 trips were made by vehicles daily between the future Ranglers location and Clifton’s Tractor Supply store.

Wed
02
Aug
admin's picture

Clear choice

With Kim Edwards selected to be the new Meridian Independent School District Superintendent, the Meridian Elementary School principal’s spot was vacated.

Starting in June in that pivotal spot was Jaime Leinhauser, who had been the fifth grade math teacher at the school for the past two years.

As such she knows the district, the community and family involvement with the school and specifically she was already familiar with the teachers and staff at the school.

“I really like the Meridian parents and community as a whole is very supportive of our school system,” Leinhauser said. “With that said we have an open door policy and want them involved in our students’ lives.”

An interview committee including Edwards, teachers and staff saw letters from 26 applicants and after review spoke to five excellent candidates. After ranking the interviewed candidates, Leinhauser clearly came out on top.

Wed
02
Aug
admin's picture

Getting stuck in the mud

In spite of Meridian Mayor Daniel Yguerabide’s best intentions to get this boat off the embankment, afloat and moving, the Meridian City Council representing his crew remains bogged down on seemingly petty issues, stuck in a muddy creek bed, with every step a struggle, with the danger of losing their boots to the suction of the dysfunction and quick sand of negativity.

As a result, the controversy and news coverage surrounding the Meridian City Council has more concerned citizens attending council meetings than ever before. They want to hear first hand what is really going on.

In an effort to make regular city council meetings more efficient and productive, the council held it’s first non-action, open workshop July 25 to discuss the multitude of issues that need to be decided on during the next city council meeting.

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